Mothers Day 2011

It is too bad that most people will not put pen to paper to show their appreciation for their mothers until after they are dead. I was no different. Even though all the thoughts I finally put to paper were in my heart while she was living; it was in my grief that I wrote them as a eulogy to read at her funeral. My prayer is that others would be smarter than I and tell their mothers while they are living what is in their hearts. I know my mother would have loved to hear the words I put to paper and she might have framed them and put them on her wall for everyone to see. I will never know because I wrote them the day she died.

After my conversion to Christianity I made a conscious decision that before I left the home of my mother that I would give her a hug and tell her how much I loved and appreciated her for all the things she had done for me as she watched me grow up. I kept that promise, and I am glad I did. My mother was a genteel woman, easy going, took everything in stride and loved beyond the ability of most people. I have written many things about her life since she died. I titled one, “Mom’s University”, in which I talked about the family gathering around the supper table each evening to talk about our day, and that was where her nine children learned her family values that affect my life to this very day. Learning from mothers used to be a family tradition. The Thrasher family learned from our mother and mother learned from her mother, and so forth. This is the way it was done for generations until the drive up window crowd and the microwave generation came along. Those times of gathering around the table at supper time to talk about the events of the day have long passed. Now we have talking toys and PBS television to teach our children family values.

Mother
I applaud your performance, I stand in awe;
On life’s great stage, you were the greatest performer of all.
As the drama of life unfolded,
You played your part to perfection;
And when the final curtain falls Mother,
Mankind will give you a standing ovation.

On this world’s great stage of pretend;
No emmy, no oscar, did you win.
When our eternal rewards are assigned;
Dear Mother, you will be at the head of the line.
I salute you, Mother, Teacher, Friend;
For fulfilling your role daily, through to life’s end.

You were never paid millions for the role you played;
Through each heart-wrenching hour of the day.
I recall the nights when I was sick;
All night beside my bed you would sit.
And when I was young and going astray;
Only you, dear Mother, refused to turn away.

Yes, I applaud your performance, I am in awe;
On life’s great stage, you were the greatest performer of all.
And as the drama of life unfolded,
You played your part to perfection;
And when the final curtain falls Mother,
Mankind will give you a standing ovation.

I penned these words the day my mother died, August 20th, 1991. They are words that should have been said to her while she lived, not put on paper after she died. She would have, as every mother would have, loved to hear these words coming out of the mouth of someone she loved so dear.

And in conclusion to my blog entry today, I would say this, “If you want to see your mothers heart swell to the bursting point with love, tell her how much she is appreciated and loved. Do it every day, you don’t have to wait until the second Sunday in May of each year to tell how much you love her. Stop whatever you are doing and turn to her right now, give her a hug, and tell her, she is loved.” DThrash

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